The Netherlands

The Netherlands is set to join the European high-speed railway network (HSL) in a few years time. This will create new opportunities for the stations involved. Central government has reserved € 1 billion for the development of these stations and the surrounding areas. The rest of the country will profit from the spin-off of these investments, which are managed and coordinated in six Urban Key Projects, launched in 1997 by the central government. By injecting funds and procedural support, within a spatial planning policy framework, the government wants to lever public and private investment in and around the six HSL stations (Amsterdam Southern Axis, central stations of Rotterdam,...

The Directorate-General for Public Works and Water Management, a division of the Dutch Ministry of Transport and Public Works, has initiated a programme called 'Roads to the Future'. The 'floating road' is one component of this programme. The groundwater level is forecast to rise during decades to come, and the water containment is expected present serious challenges. A competition was therefore organised to generate ideas for floating roads. These roads could be used to provide access to a village cut off by flooding, or as a duplicate road alongside a bridge closed for maintenance.
The basic design is a system of easily linked standard units. The units for...

Case Rotterdam-Zoetermeer-Gouda: ‘Governance’ for regional development

Spatial development is increasingly framed as development on a regional (or supra local) scale. The case Rotterdam-Zoetermeer-Gouda (RZG) covers a large area in the heart of the Randstad Holland, the most internationally oriented metropolitan region in the Netherlands. On this area a large potential development program has accumulated over the years – housing, industry, horticulture, nature development, water storage, recreation - but without coherence. The area is the lowest lying in the Netherlands and suffers from high water tables. By removing the area from the protective veils of the...

This project is one of the 14 national "example" projects for "Developmental Spatial Planning" (integrated regional developmental planning). The project is located in the delta of the river IJssel, a branch of the Rhine. The area features a unique open landscape and is therefore designated a National Landscape. Here, a growing safety problem related to floodrisk has to be handled ("room for the river"), and a major housing target has to be adressed. A new railway tracé has been endorsed and will have to be realised by the year 2012. The aim of the project is to integrate these objectives, together with protection of the historical landscape-elements...

Phileas is a new concept of sustainable urban transport, used as a backbone for urban redevelopment.This new form of public transport has been developed to become the axis of redeveloping the west corridor of the city of Eindhoven. It links Eindhoven central station and Eindhoven airport. It is supposed to provide an alternative for the car. Based on an international comparison and a feasible study, the potential of this new system was indicated, depending on the right set of supporting conditions. Multiple land use are projected along this corridor. A series of new developments and restructuring projects have been planning along this corridor, including revitalisation of station area...

Aim:To integrate land-use functions and city policy objectives.

Preliminary: City land at the eastern urban fringe of the city of Delft -the Upper Bieslandse Polder- was leased to six farmers, none of whom could make a full living from it. Since 1995 one of the farmers, Jan Duijndam, who already owned 50 acres of land nearby, took up the idea to convert to organic farming. He found a partner in the Delft Initiatves for Nature group. In 1997 they laid down a plan for organic farming at the Upper Bieslandse Polder. Two goals were aimed for: First the take-over of the tenacy rights of the other 5 farmers, so that Duijndam could expand his organic farm , and second nature...

The “Diemerzeedijk” is a dike between Amsterdam and Muiden. It is made to protect the land against the sea (the “Zuiderzee”). In 1932 the Zuiderzee was cut off from the North Sea and became the largest fresh water lake of the Netherlands (the “IJsselmeer”). In the sixties and seventies, the dike was used for dirt combustion and along the dike, waste was deposed. In 1983 the refuse dump was closed

In 1998 the clean-up of the refuse dump started. It was ended in 2001. The polluted area is isolated by 26 m. deep screens, that rest on a clay layer. On top of the screens rest a few impermeable top layers. The groundwatertable in the isolated area...